Christianity · Theology

The Five Anglican Marks of Mission and the Pentagrammaton

I’m knocking this up in my lunch break, so please excuse its rough nature.

My new job intersects my spirituality beautifully and sometimes throws up interesting connections. Today after meditation and preparing to work on a document concerning the Anglican Marks of Mission I saw a link between the Five Marks and the Holy Pentagrammaton, the name of Jesus.

The Marks of Mission are:

  1. To proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom.
  2. To teach, baptise and nurture new believers.
  3. To respond to human need by loving service.
  4. To transform unjust structures of society, to challenge violence of every kind and pursue peace and reconciliation.
  5. To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation, and sustain and renew the life of the earth.

http://www.anglicancommunion.org/identity/marks-of-mission.aspx

I do not for a second think the Anglican Communion developed this schema with reference to the Holy Five-Lettered Name of God, YHShVH, which is an esoteric, post-reformation symbolic adaption of the Hebrew name for Jesus.

However, sometimes things do cohere and I am very capable of seeing meaning in all sorts of things 🙂 It is interesting to note the history of the Marks though. Originally four and then quickly expanded to five (to include care of Creation). There was also a movement to enlarge the schema to six marks, but in the end the fourth mark was expanded keeping the schema intact. Some folk (myself included) see poetic significance and resonance with the Five Wounds of Christ. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

The Pentagrammaton has rich resonances, among which are the four ancient elemental principles (plus spirit) and the Worlds of the Qabalah. It is often displayed as a pentagram (which was a Christian symbol long before modern Neo-Paganism adopted it).

The Pentagrammaton also connects with the Five Marks:

Letter of YHShVH

Element Wound

Mark

Yod Fire Foot To transform unjust structures of society.
Heh Water Hand To respond to human need by loving service.
Shin Spirit Side (heart) To proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom.
Vau Air Hand To teach, baptise and nurture new believers.
Heh (final) Earth Foot To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation.

On the Pentagram:

pentagrmmaton and marks of mission

  • The proclamation of the Kingdom obviously relates to the Spirit – it is from this that all other Marks follow. It is the heart of the matter, which is why it relates to Christ’s central wound, whence flows blood and water for the sake of the entire world.
  • Teaching and baptising is the extension of the church and Christ to the person. It therefore relates to the extended and open hand which draws one into the Church (baptism).  In the scheme of the elements it relates to Air, the use of the airy intellect in teaching and guiding one towards Confirmation and beyond.
  • The response to human need by loving service relates to the depth of the Watery Heh. Again, this is an action of the hand, extended in love to the other.

We now move to the communal and the letters here relate to the feet, movement and action in the world, for the group not just the person. Perfect for the two basal points of the diagram 🙂

  • Transformation of society and the purging of injustice relates to Fire, the power of the Christian message to change all things throughout the world.
  • Caring for God’s creation obviously relates to the element of Earth, another communal endeavour.

It is of course significant that the Spirit in this diagram, the proclamation of the Kingdom connects directly (right and left) to social justice (Fire) and ecological care (Earth), both communal processes.* This shows clearly the Kingdom is corporate and not individual. In Christ, there are no ‘individuals’. There is only the person, existing within and interdependent on Creation and the Social (bottom left and right).

OK? Enough now, back to work!

* It is also kinda neat that my job concerns these two areas directly 🙂

 

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